What healthcare leaders need to know now

 

Classic content from 2015 Top 25 Women in Healthcare: Maureen Bisognano from the IHI

By | October 30th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Classic content from 2015: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

 

“Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

 

That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

 

“Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

 

The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

 

“I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

 

 

ICYMI: Top 25 Women in Healthcare: Tejal Gandhi

By | October 23rd, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Tejal Gandhi: “If you start to pay for value, part of the value is quality and safety. Boards are going to have to become more knowledgeable.”

 

Classic content from 2015: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

The patient-safety movement has made slow and steady progress in the U.S. healthcare industry. But to achieve a faster pace of change, Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, says change needs to come from the top of each organization – and that means above the CEO.

 

“We talk about CEOs and leadership in terms of patient safety, but I think the involvement of governance and boards is a major gap we’re overlooking,” says Gandhi, president and CEO of the National Patient Safety Foundation. “Most boards don’t know much about quality and safety. They tend to leave that to the clinicians and aren’t necessarily demanding better performance in this area.”

 

The move away from fee-for-service payment in healthcare makes this even more critical, she adds.

 

“If you start to pay for value, part of the value is quality and safety,” Gandhi says. “Boards are going to have to become more knowledgeable, and they will; they are smart people and will ask the right questions. Workplace safety is a big issue in every industry. The directors will need to demand more and even think about CEO incentives being tied to safety and quality.”

 

Gandhi, who served as chief quality and safety officer at Partners Healthcare and executive director of safety and quality at Brigham and Women’s Hospital before joining NPSF, believes most healthcare CEOs want to improve safety but get overwhelmed about where and how to begin.

 

“I think CEOs want to create the right culture – they know a culture of safety is important – but how to actually do it is where the challenge is.”

 

One key element of NPSF is its respected think tank, the Lucian Leape Institute, named after the Harvard physician and researcher regarded as one of the pioneers of the patient-safety movement. At the institute’s retreat last February, Gandhi said the leaders came to the conclusion that they needed to sharpen their focus on helping healthcare CEOs. Read more…

 

 

Maureen Bisognano looks beyond the healthcare silo for improvement

By | October 16th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

 

“Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

 

That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

 

“Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

 

The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

 

“I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

 

 

ACHE report on diversity: The more that things change…

By | October 9th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

ACHE's report on diversity and inclusion in healthcare leadership shows the industry still has a long way to go.

 

Every five or six years, the American College of Healthcare Executives conducts a new survey on diversity and inclusion in healthcare as it relates to leadership of our industry.

 

Its new report, by Leslie Athey, starts with a pretty candid preamble, essentially saying, “We’ve been talking about the lack of diversity at the top in healthcare for years. Why another survey?” Then it answers its own question: Because things haven’t changed.

 

According to the survey, racial and ethnic disparities are very much alive in the healthcare industry today. African-American respondents indicate their salaries are lower than those of their white counterparts. “Further,” says ACHE, “minority respondents were less likely to report that race relations in their organizations were good and more likely to report their careers had been negatively impacted by discrimination.”

 

The article can be found in the September/October issue of Healthcare Executive magazine. For the full special report, click here.

 

ACHE notes that strides have been made, but there is still a long way to go. That’s also the reason we continue to sponsor the Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare and the Top 25 Women in Healthcare awards for Modern Healthcare. We haven’t arrived yet as an industry. The message still needs to be repeated. Leaders of healthcare organizations should reflect the communities and members they serve; statistics show that companies with diverse leadership perform better than those that don’t. It’s as simple as that.

 

 

 

 

The nitty-gritty realities of succession planning

By | October 2nd, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

In some places, succession planning is the 800-pound gorilla in the room.

 

In healthcare, we have a tendency to nod our heads when it’s suggested how important succession planning is — and then shy away from the particulars of how to accomplish that.

 

It’s a delicate dance: how does the leader make a graceful exit while the new executive is determined to put his or her stamp on the organization going forward?

 

In some places, it’s the 800-pound elephant in the corner of the room. But it doesn’t have to be. In a refreshingly candid look at the topic in Trustee magazine, published by the American Hospital Association, CEOs like Kindred’s Ben Breier and Allina’s Penny Wheeler, along with board chair Gene Toombs of St. Luke’s in St. Louis, look at the process and share some insights on how they and their organizations made succession planning flat-out work.

 

At Furst Group, we are proud to underwrite this insightful look at what can be a very thorny topic. We hope you’ll take a look. Click here to read the article. If you’d prefer a PDF copy, you can find that here. Thanks for reading!