What healthcare leaders need to know now

 

Christine Candio talks about the transformational impact that technology is having on the patient-care life cycle

By | January 24th, 2018 | Blog, Industry Reports | Add A Comment

 

Christine Candio

“From an organizational perspective, digital transformation has required us to evaluate our organizational structure and leadership education.”


Christine Candio, President and CEO of St. Luke’s Hospital, recently gave us the pleasure of discussing her views on the transformational impact that technology has on the patient-care life cycle, as part of a collaborative industry report conducted by IIC Partners, including Furst Group and other Life Science and Healthcare Practice members.


How does digital transformation affect the patient care life cycle for your organization?


Our main goal with the utilization of enhanced digitization of our healthcare data is to improve the overall health and wellness of our patients. We see this evolving as we focus our goals around the ‘ownership’ of the patient record, our ability to use data to find opportunities to proactively manage patient populations, and to set a strategy in place for digital outreach to our patient populations and deliver care when and where they require it. From a data ownership perspective, we are in the process of implementing an integrated Electronic Medical Record (EMR) solution, allowing for a single consolidated patient record. We are then layering on top of the EMR a patient portal which we will use to effectively communicate the overall status of a patient’s health, allowing them access to their records and be able to interact with our organization in real-time.


The long-term goal of this use of technology is to remove the historic silos of data and transition the ownership of those records to the patient to better manage their own health. In addition to the single EMR platform, we are implementing a robust data analytics and population health solution that will enable us to identify populations of patients and their associated risk level. By using this data, we can proactively focus on patients that are at high or rising risks to better manage and identify care opportunities.


How does digital transformation change the demands in existing leadership structures and what new roles arise as a result of digital transformation?


From an organizational perspective, digital transformation has required us to evaluate our organizational structure and leadership education. Over the past few years, we have identified positions and committees such as a Chief Medical Information Officer, Population Health Physician Liaison and the Informatics Committee. These aim to better align the needs of physicians with information technology being delivered by the organization. We have also created new leadership areas such as a population health department. As our strategy begins to take place around telehealth, we will need to consider the leadership necessary to support this initiative as well.


What are the largest challenges when it comes to digital transformation and patient care for your organization?


There are a number of challenges when considering and implementing these new technologies. The largest opportunity that we are currently managing is our ability to keep up with the ‘rate of change’ with these technology solutions. Although the amount of data and the capabilities and utilization of that data is bringing a tremendous amount of opportunities to the healthcare industry, these solutions are being developed faster than many organizations can implement them. When considering this and the ever-changing regulatory environment, this constant and rapid rate of change on many healthcare providers, especially the physician community, can cause a tremendous amount of stress and burnout. It has been very important for us to build a strong relationship with the physician community that includes their involvement in the process from strategic planning to solution implementation. These solutions need to be carefully rolled out in a mindful way that takes into consideration the impact on our healthcare providers, their workflows, and our patients.


How does digital transformation of other key players in the healthcare system (hospitals, health insurance, pharmaceutical companies) impact your business?


The ability to have data transparency across all sectors/players in the healthcare industry is critical for our organization and our patients. The capabilities to data mine clinical activities within our single EMR is very beneficial, but still leaves the overall patient health profile incomplete. Without access to insurance and claims data, any services provided outside of our system are not acknowledged, and will possibly falsely show as a gap in patient care or opportunity. Without the data from pharmacy beneficiary managers and pharmaceutical companies, we will not have access to medications that patients may be paying out of pocket for, again falsely showing gaps in medication compliance. These false positives will be a drain on our healthcare resources and frustrating for patients. It is critical for our organization and as an industry that we continue to push for data transparency and standards.




Do you find similar challenges in your organization? We’d love to hear your thoughts below in the Comments section.


You can find more insights on this topic in the full IIC Partners’ industry report, “Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle,” which includes more interviews with top healthcare executives around the world.


Read the Industry Report Button


 

 

Regional Health President and CEO, Brent Phillips, shares his perspective of technology’s influence on Healthcare.

By | December 5th, 2017 | Blog, Industry Reports | Add A Comment

 

Brent Phillips, Regional Health President and CEO

“I personally want to see more roles that look at HOW we capitalize on digital transformation and not just how to adopt it.”


In a recent interview with Brent Phillips, President & CEO of Regional Health, we explored, in collaboration with IIC Partners, the impact that digital transformation is having on healthcare and the patient-care life cycle.


How does digital transformation affect the patient care life cycle for your organization?


I would like to see digital transformation really shift the patient care life cycle paradigm on its head. Digital transformation can allow patients to receive care when they need it, in an environment where they need it—in their “lifespace.” This can be the home, office or even in the classroom. Reimbursement models will need to adapt to allow for this, but digital transformation in other aspects of our lives will push our patients to demand this type of care. Another example of this is the site AnyLabTestNow.com, which allows patients to order and review lab results for simple blood tests, hormone tests and genetic screening without a physician order. Why would a patient need to come to a traditional healthcare setting when these types of services are offered? We need to consider how we will tap into these new options and still provide traditional healthcare services for those that need it.


How does digital transformation change the demands in existing leadership structures and what new roles arise as a result of digital transformation?


The new role I have created at Regional Health, for the Chief Performance Officer, is a great example of a leadership role developed to support the changes that digital transformation is bringing. The idea of bringing together system-wide services such as enterprise intelligence, quality and operational performance management makes so much sense. This will allow us to better connect technology to the patient care life-cycle. This next comment may be controversial, but I think the role of the CMIO and CIO will diminish and disappear over time. All caregivers need to use technology ALL of the time, and this won’t be seen as a unique skill set but rather mandatory. Standardization is being driven by both technology and value-based care, which will also drive less need for IT development and support. Cloud technologies will create less reliance for on-site IT personnel. I personally want to see more roles that look at HOW we capitalize on digital transformation and not just how to adopt it.


In what ways does big data impact your organization and how can it improve the patient care experience?


I am not sure that “big data” is the term I would use. However, transformation of data to information will have a huge impact—if we approach it correctly. We need to know what the right “test questions” are and focus more on our use of data. This has been a challenge in every healthcare organization I have worked in. We need to start small, show value and process improvement through data and then expand. I think we will see more consolidation of data sources, and this will become advantageous for organizations like Regional Health. We will need to watch this space and understand how to tap into these sources. Technology that allows us to bring together disparate data is also changing and becoming less costly and more available, but there is a cultural challenge to overcome for institutions. Many people are stuck in the traditional data warehousing mentality and this can have a negative impact on transformation. Regional Health will benefit from data interoperability efforts, especially for people visiting remote areas who need our care. If we can connect with their home healthcare organizations and retrieve necessary data, this will allow for safe and efficient care delivery.


What are the largest challenges when it comes to digital transformation and patient care for your organization?


Cost. State-of-the-art technologies are not inexpensive and changes in reimbursement are not making it easy for us to continue to invest heavily in some of the infrastructure we need. At the same time, people are reluctant to move to the cloud which also isn’t necessarily inexpensive either. There is definitely a lack of skilled people available in data analytics and integration of technology. Finally, culture is a major challenge given that we haven’t been early adopters to technology in general and now we are playing catch-up.


How does digital transformation of other key players in the healthcare system (hospitals, health insurance, pharmaceutical companies) impact your business?


Our competition is no longer local—it is everywhere, even international. When a patient can conduct a virtual visit in a more convenient way than they can with Regional Health, how do we convince them to still come to us? There will also be technologies (e.g., remote monitoring, medical devices) that will allow for care to be delivered in different ways that we will need to evaluate for adoption. Insurance transformation (or lack thereof) is probably an area that can most negatively impact Regional Health. If we want to deliver care in different ways, but reimbursement isn’t available, this will halt our ability to take advantage of these digital advances.




What are your thoughts on the impact of technology on the patient life cycle and healthcare in general? Share them below in the Comments section.


Read additional insights in the full IIC Partners’ industry report, “Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle,” which includes more interviews with top healthcare executives around the world.


Read the Industry Report Button


 

 

Hospital Safety Grade is a simple but powerful way that Leah Binder and Leapfrog Group help make patients safer

By | May 25th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Leah Binder: “Nothing is as critical as making sure people don’t die from preventable errors. Safety has to come first, every minute of every day. Otherwise, patients will suffer.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

Sometimes, the simple things are the easiest to understand. Perhaps that’s one reason that the Leapfrog Group’s Hospital Safety Grade has caught on in such a big way – even with hospitals, who largely weren’t all that thrilled when it was initially launched five years ago.

 

“The response of hospitals has been one of the brightest spots for me in my career,” Leapfrog President and CEO Leah Binder says. “Hospitals are approaching their Hospital Safety Grade constructively. They’re talking about what they are going to do to improve and how proud they are of this ‘A.’ They talk about how they’re not going to stop their efforts to ensure that patients are safe, and describing what those efforts will be.”

 

Every six months, Leapfrog assigns an A, B, C, D or F grade to 2,600 general, acute-care hospitals, rating their performance on safety. It uses standardized measures from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, its own hospital survey, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Hospital Association.

 

“Many people – even if they’re on the board of a hospital – don’t realize the problem of safety,” Binder says. “When they look into it, they realize how many things can go wrong in a hospital, and that makes a big difference. That’s why I think it’s been important for us to highlight this in a way that’s easily accessible to laypeople.”

 

While everybody wants an “A,” Binder has seen unfavorable grades spur some action.

 

“We see boards get very upset. We see community members get upset. We see repeated articles in newspapers about poor grades,” Binder observes. “We’ve found that it gets their attention, which is a good thing. In fact, we’ve seen hospitals just completely turn around their safety programs when they get a bad grade.”

 

What people outside the healthcare industry don’t always recognize is that the Leapfrog Group was founded by large employers and groups who purchase healthcare and wanted to see some changes in the quality of the care they were paying for.

 

“Employers are not in the business of healthcare,” says Binder. “They’re in the business of doing other things. They make airplanes, and they make automobiles and they run retail department stores. And so, they don’t have a staff of 500 to figure out what’s going on in healthcare, so they rely on organizations like us to try to pull all those resources together for them and help them make the right strategic decisions.”

 

Leapfrog has some compatriots in this area, including the National Business Group on Health, regional groups, and a newcomer called Health Transformation Alliance, in which 20 major employers are teaming up to lower prescription costs, review claims together, structure benefits and create networks.

 

“There’s probably at least 50 organizations that represent specialties for physicians alone,” Binder says. “I don’t think there are nearly enough organizations that are advancing purchaser concerns about healthcare delivery. The purchasers pay for about 20 percent of the $3 trillion healthcare industry, which is a lot of money.”

 

Despite the increased scrutiny, Binder says she thinks the healthcare industry has taken its eye off safety, given the myriad deaths still linked to errors each year.

 

“I think the industry has not been focused on patient safety enough. They’ve been distracted by the compliance with the Affordable Care Act, value-based purchasing, bill payments, new models for financing and delivering care, and change in state and CMS regulations. While those efforts are important, nothing is as critical as making sure people don’t die from preventable errors. Safety has to come first, every minute of every day. Otherwise, patients will suffer.”

 

Binder is doing her best to keep the priority on patients. – in fact, the organization is broadening its reach at the request of its members to take a closer look at other sticky matters in safety:

 

  • Maternity. “Employers pay for half of all the births in this country. Childbirth is by far the number-one reason for admission to a hospital. A C-section is the number one surgical procedure performed in this country. So, we now have some incredible data on maternity care, and employers are starting to meet with hospitals and design packages that encourage the use of hospitals with lower C-section rates based on the Leapfrog data.”
  •  

  • Outpatient and ambulatory care. “We’re going to start rating outpatient surgical units and ambulatory surgical centers. That’s a big priority for purchasers because they are sending a lot of employees to ambulatory surgical centers because they tend to be lower-priced. That’s great – some of them are excellent – but we don’t have enough good data nationally to compare them on safety and quality.”
  •  

  • Children’s hospitals. “There’s a lot of people who would never travel outside their community for their own healthcare, but will travel if they have a very sick child. This year, we added two new measures. We ask pediatric hospitals to do a CAP survey for children’s hospitals. The other thing we’re looking at is exposure to radiation. Sometimes, children have repeated imaging and it can really add up.”
  •  

    Although it is Leapfrog’s job to act as a watchdog for employers and patients, Binder says she does see some positive movement.

     

    “There are bright spots,” she says. “There is a Partnership for Patients program that just concluded with CMS that has demonstrated some real impact. We see reductions in certain kinds of infections and real changes in the ways that hospitals are approaching patient care to address safety. CMS has tracked some saved lives as a result of those changes, and we certainly appreciate those numbers. We’re going in the right direction; we just need a lot more push.”

     

     

    SIDEBAR: Making a difference with the mundane

     

    Hospital deaths and injuries from errors are not always obvious.

     

    “When someone dies from an error or an accident, it’s not easy to track,” says Leah Binder, president and CEO of the Leapfrog Group. “It often doesn’t show up in claims. It can be complicated – the death might be attributed to something else even though, say, there was clearly an infection that hastened the death. It’s just kind of the course of business in the hospital.”

     

    Nearly two decades after the ground-breaking report “To Err is Human,” far too many people are still being killed and injured in healthcare settings, Binder says.

     

    “More than 200,000 people are dying every year from preventable accidents in hospitals,” she says. “We believe that’s a low estimate. There’s lots of accidents and problems in hospitals we can’t measure because no one is tracking them. An example of that would be medication errors, which are the most common errors in hospitals. There’s not a standardized way of tracking that, so we don’t even know how many deaths or adverse events result.”

     

    What is especially frustrating for Binder and her team is that many injuries and deaths happen in spite of the fact the healthcare industry knows how to prevent them. “The fact is, patient safety requires a disciplined, persistent commitment to the mundane habits that save lives,” she says.

     

    “How much more mundane can it possibly be than to say, ‘Everybody needs to wash their hands all the time’? ‘We need to wear the right protective clothing.’ ‘Follow the rules – every single rule every single time.’ ‘We need to do the same checklist every time we do a surgery.’

     

    “Let’s face it, these sound boring. But done systematically, they save lives. And everyone in patient care needs to be disciplined about doing them.”

     

     

     

     

    Delaware Valley ACO’s Katherine Schneider uses population health to improve patients’ lives, one at a time

    By | May 16th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Katherine Schneider: “I’m seeing opportunities to transform the healthcare system to improve population health outcomes. That’s been my career niche since the day I finished my residency training.”

     

    One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

     

    Katherine Schneider, MD, the president and CEO of the Delaware Valley ACO in the Philadelphia region—an accountable care organization owned by Main Line Health and Jefferson Health—has long been ahead of the game in whatever pursuit she has chosen.

     

    She was part of the first group of U.S. physicians to earn subspecialty certification in clinical informatics. She led the implementation of value-based payment models at Middlesex Health System in central Connecticut, long before “value-based” was a common adjective in the healthcare lexicon. She was the senior vice president of health engagement at AtlantiCare, leading its pioneering move to accountable care and co-designing a value-based insurance benefit for 10,000 employees. She also served as executive vice president and chief medical officer for Medecision, which provided population health technology for health systems and health insurers.

     

    That’s a lot of trailblazing but, to Schneider, it’s just a steady progression along the path of transforming care.

     

    “Whether you call it community benefits, clinical integration, population health or accountable care, this concept of a health system being responsible for more than just transactional care is really what this is all about.”

     

    Major achievements started early for Schneider, who skipped from sixth to ninth grade as an adolescent, ending up in college at 15 and in medical school four years later.

     

    “When I was 11, we moved from New York City to Austria due to my father’s work,” she says. “I went from a very good private school in Manhattan to a very small, hands-on international school.

     

    “I had the threat of ending up at an Austrian convent school hanging over me,” she jokes, “so I did really well.”

     

    Though she was much younger than her medical-school classmates, she can’t resist some more self-deprecation.

     

    “Yes, I was 19 when I went to medical school, but I made up for it because I spent nine years in medical and graduate school,” she says of the combination MD-PhD program she enrolled in. “To make a long story short, I became much more interested in public health and policy. So, I actually switched into the epidemiology program at Columbia University.”

     

    She also chose family medicine, not one of the higher-paying specialties.

     

    “Family medicine seemed to me a great fit for someone interested in population health and policy,” Schneider says. “It’s womb to tomb, broad clinical experience.”

     

    That made giving up the practice of medicine difficult when she eventually had the opportunity to potentially impact more lives in a different kind of role. Not that she doesn’t have some regrets about not seeing patients anymore.

     

    “I do miss it,” she admits. “But there are a lot of really good doctors out there. I was a good doctor too, but I have a skill set that not a lot of people have, which is a combination of the population-health aspects and the clinical experience. I’m seeing opportunities to transform the healthcare system to improve population health outcomes. That’s been my career niche since the day I finished my residency training.”

     

    Schneider finds her role leading one of the nation’s leading ACOs to be inspiring, but also challenging at times.

     

    “I was recently at a fireside chat featuring Michael Dowling, the CEO of Northwell Health, and he said that, to be in healthcare, you have to be an optimist but you almost have to be chronically unhappy with the status quo.”

     

    Schneider says she wouldn’t describe herself as an optimist, but says she “is pretty resilient and determined,” traits she learned from her mother who fought—and beat—tuberculosis as a young woman. “What I learned from my mom is the power of perseverance against the odds.”

     

    The perseverance these days comes from battling that persistent status quo—part of the marching orders for an ACO—where so many factions in healthcare have lobbyists to protect their interests, even when change can streamline care or bring about better outcomes.

     

    “What one person calls waste is someone else’s lunch,” she says. “If you’re going to get waste out of the system—even through innovation—that’s still taking money away from someone and they’re going to fight it tooth and nail. We’re not going to solve this problem unless we’re willing to admit that and take it on.”

     

    Schneider, for one, is ready to wade into the fray.

     

    “I truly believe that we can do better and that most of us want to do better to serve our community and our country.”

     

     

    SIDEBAR: In a sea of data, the power of stories

     

    Katherine Schneider is a national leader in clinical informatics, but she’s a big believer in the power of stories. That’s why she and her team at Delaware Valley ACO open their meetings with a value-based story of impacting the life of a patient or a provider.

     

    “You can talk all you want about care management and Triple Aim but, ultimately, if you can tell the story of how you’ve changed a patient’s life or a physician’s practice, people get it,” she says.

     

    One example: A 92-year-old woman has been to the emergency room numerous times because she can’t get out of her bathtub. She calls her friends from the tub, who call 911. Over and over. Delaware Valley steps in and, within 24 hours, has connected her to free services in her community that come in and install grab bars and railings and retrofit her home. She doesn’t need to call for help anymore.

     

    “Not everything we do is that simple,” Schneider cautions. “We also work with some extremely overwhelming, complex patients and make some small wins for them. A win is not like a cell in a spreadsheet. It’s not a graph on a PowerPoint. It’s really in the stories.”

     

     

     

     

    Furst Group principal Deanna Banks to speak at ACHE

    By | March 24th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Deanna Banks speaks on talent solutions in healthcare at the ACHE Congress on Tuesday, March 28, at the Hilton Chicago.

     

    Deanna Banks, principal of Furst Group and a longtime mentor to many healthcare executives, will be one of the presenters for “Executive Search in Healthcare,” a seminar scheduled as part of the 2017 Congress on Healthcare Leadership on Tuesday, March 28, in Chicago.

     

    Joining Banks as a presenter will be Stephanie J. Underwood of Tyler & Company and Barry R. Cesafsky of CES Partners Ltd. The trio will share their personal perspectives on why some executives are chosen repeatedly for new and better jobs while others are overlooked.

     

    The session is scheduled from 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. at the Hilton Chicago. The Congress is presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives.

     

    Banks joined Furst Group’s East Coast practice as a vice president in 1998, was promoted to a Principal in 2006, and now has an ownership interest in Furst Group. Deanna founded the firm’s Washington, D.C., office where she serves a national client base, placing executives and providing talent counsel to many of the premier health systems and health plans in the country.

     

    For more information on American College of Healthcare Executives Congress, visit www.ache.org/congress.

     

     

     

    Top 25 Women in Healthcare announced

    By | March 3rd, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    MH-2017

     

    We hope to see you July 19 in Nashville.

     

    That’s when Modern Healthcare will honor the Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017, in tandem with the Women Leaders in Healthcare conference. The winners were announced this week.

     

    The awards, sponsored by Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, the companies of MPI, honor 25 of the most powerful executives in the healthcare industry, in addition to 10 additional executives selected as Women Leaders to Watch.

     

    The Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017 are:

     

  • Nancy Howell Agee, President/CEO, Carilion Clinic
  • Leah Binder, President/CEO, Leapfrog Group
  • Marna Borgstrom, President/CEO, Yale New Haven (Conn.) Health System
  • Deborah Bowen, President/CEO, American College of Healthcare Executives
  • Mary Brainerd, President/CEO, HealthPartners
  • Ruth Brinkley, President and CEO, KentuckyOne Health
  • Debra Cafaro, Chair/CEO, Ventas
  • Susan DeVore, President/CEO, Premier
  • Deborah DiSanzo, General Manager, IBM Watson Health
  • Judith Faulkner, President/CEO, Epic Systems Corp
  • Halee Fischer-Wright, President/CEO, Medical Group Management Association
  • Tejal Gandhi, President/CEO, National Patient Safety Foundation
  • Laura Kaiser, Incoming CEO, SSM Health
  • Sister Carol Keehan, President/CEO, Catholic Health Association
  • Sarah Krevans, President/CEO, Sutter Health
  • Karen Lynch, President, Aetna
  • Beverly Malone, CEO, National League for Nursing
  • Patricia Maryland, CEO, Ascension Healthcare
  • Nancy Schlichting, Retired CEO, Henry Ford Health System
  • Lynn Simon, President of Clinical Services/Chief Quality Officer, Community Health Systems
  • Paula Steiner, President/CEO, Health Care Service Corp.
  • Marilyn Tavenner, President/CEO, America’s Health Insurance Plans
  • Annette Walker, President of Strategy/CEO, Providence St. Joseph Health/St. Joseph Health
  • Emma Walmsley, Incoming CEO, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Marla Weston, CEO, ANA Enterprise
  •  

    In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Women Leaders to Watch:

     

  • Julia Andrieni, CEO, Houston Methodist Physicians’ Alliance for Quality
  • Christine Candio, CEO, St. Luke’s Hospital
  • Mandy Cohen, Health and Human Services secretary, State of North Carolina
  • Laura Forese, Executive VP/COO, New York Presbyterian
  • Sally Hurt-Deitch, Market CEO, the Hospitals of Providence
  • Kathy Lancaster, Executive VP and CFO, Kaiser Permanente
  • Sue Schick, Chief Growth Officer, UnitedHealthcare Community & State
  • Katherine Schneider, CEO, Delaware Valley ACO
  • Marla Silliman, SEO Children’s and Women’s Health Services, CEO, Florida Hospital for Children
  • Suzanne White, Executive VP and CMO, Detroit Medical Center
  •  

    For more information, click here.

     

     

     

     

    Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare–Delvecchio Finley: Leaders understand that medical care is only part of the solution to disparities

    By | December 29th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Delvecchio Finley: “Even though access to care and the quality of care is important, access to stable housing, food sources, education and jobs play a greater influence collectively on our overall health.”

     

    Classic content: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

     

    Delvecchio Finley doesn’t shrink back from a challenge.

     

    That’s one of the reasons his last two jobs have been leading California public health organizations with different but significant issues. But as he surveys the changes needed not only within his own health system but throughout the nation as a whole, he is adamant that healthcare is only part of the solution for what ails the U.S.

     

    “Even though access to care and the quality of care is important, access to stable housing, food sources, education and jobs play a greater influence collectively on our overall health,” says Finley, CEO of the Alameda Health System. “I think the evolving research in the field is making it a lot more evident to all of us that those issues are significant social determinants of health.”

     

    The interconnectedness of all those factors makes health disparities harder to eradicate, Finley says, but one way to begin is to address the lack of diversity in healthcare leadership and the healthcare workforce as a whole.

     

    “Making sure that our workforce is representative of the community we serve – that people who are coming to us for care aren’t just the recipients of that care but can also play a major role in providing or facilitating that care – is what starts to provide access to good jobs and stable housing, and in turn begins to build a good economic engine for the community.

     

    “Thus, you’re reinvesting in the community, and that’s how we start to get at the root of this and not just through the delivery of the services.”

     

    Finley has some life experience along those lines. He grew up in public housing in Atlanta, where access to healthcare was poor even though the actual care was excellent when he and his family received it. In his neighborhood, he says, the three fields of employment that offered paths to upward mobility were healthcare, education and law enforcement. He was a strong student, and enjoyed helping people, so he was eyeing a future as a physician during his undergraduate years at Emory University, where he earned his degree in chemistry.

     

    “Upon finishing my degree, I realized that I loved science but wasn’t necessarily as strong in it as I needed to be to become a doctor,” he says. “But I still loved healthcare and wanted that to be something I pursued.”

     

    He explored other avenues and ended up earning his master’s in public policy at Duke University. Finley was the first member of his family to graduate from college and to get a graduate degree as well, but not the last, he is quick to point out. Read more…

     

     

    Delvecchio Finley: Medical care only part of the solution to health disparities

    By | August 24th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Delvecchio Finley: “Even though access to care and the quality of care is important, access to stable housing, food sources, education and jobs play a greater influence collectively on our overall health.”

     

    Delvecchio Finley doesn’t shrink back from a challenge.

     

    That’s one of the reasons his last two jobs have been leading California public health organizations with different but significant issues. But as he surveys the changes needed not only within his own health system but throughout the nation as a whole, he is adamant that healthcare is only part of the solution for what ails the U.S.

     

    “Even though access to care and the quality of care is important, access to stable housing, food sources, education and jobs play a greater influence collectively on our overall health,” says Finley, CEO of the Alameda Health System. “I think the evolving research in the field is making it a lot more evident to all of us that those issues are significant social determinants of health.”

     

    The interconnectedness of all those factors makes health disparities harder to eradicate, Finley says, but one way to begin is to address the lack of diversity in healthcare leadership and the healthcare workforce as a whole.

     

    “Making sure that our workforce is representative of the community we serve – that people who are coming to us for care aren’t just the recipients of that care but can also play a major role in providing or facilitating that care – is what starts to provide access to good jobs and stable housing, and in turn begins to build a good economic engine for the community.

     

    “Thus, you’re reinvesting in the community, and that’s how we start to get at the root of this and not just through the delivery of the services.”

     

    Finley has some life experience along those lines. He grew up in public housing in Atlanta, where access to healthcare was poor even though the actual care was excellent when he and his family received it. In his neighborhood, he says, the three fields of employment that offered paths to upward mobility were healthcare, education and law enforcement. He was a strong student, and enjoyed helping people, so he was eyeing a future as a physician during his undergraduate years at Emory University, where he earned his degree in chemistry.

     

    “Upon finishing my degree, I realized that I loved science but wasn’t necessarily as strong in it as I needed to be to become a doctor,” he says. “But I still loved healthcare and wanted that to be something I pursued.”

     

    He explored other avenues and ended up earning his master’s in public policy at Duke University. Finley was the first member of his family to graduate from college and to get a graduate degree as well, but not the last, he is quick to point out. Read more…

     

     

    Classic content from 2015 Top 25 Women in Healthcare: Maureen Bisognano from the IHI

    By | October 30th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

     

    Classic content from 2015: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

     

    For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

     

    “Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

     

    That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

     

    “Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

     

    The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

     

    “I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

     

    Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

     

     

    Maureen Bisognano looks beyond the healthcare silo for improvement

    By | October 16th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

     

    One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

     

    For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

     

    “Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

     

    That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

     

    “Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

     

    The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

     

    “I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

     

    Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

     

     

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